Graphic Design Careers – Versatility For the Future

Graphic design has been part of human expression for ages; from the first person who made some sort of drawing on a rock face or cave wall, graphic design has been instrumental in getting ideas across to others through visual representation. Today, designers are responsible for bringing together text, pictures, and concepts in a variety of media-usually advertisements, websites, and publications. Many graphic designers begin work as assistants or apprentices, learning essentials on the job-such as creating designs for direct mailings and making logos. Although many work for a wide range of companies, many also work as freelancers and entrepreneurs. It’s important to remain flexible, to keep learning and expanding; the demand for good graphic designers is always on the rise, and by keeping your abilities fresh and up-to-date you can stay current with whatever an employer needs.

One of the most critical abilities a good graphic design professional has, besides a “good eye” for what’s visually effective and appealing, is good interpersonal and communication skills. Often, graphic designers need to make presentations for their clients; these presentations must illustrate a thorough understanding of the design, why particular elements were chosen, and why the design is effective. A good education from a school or college is highly recommended, too-with a foundation formed at the high school level. An interest in a graphic design career can be kindled through an internship while at high school or college, where the prospective graphic designer can be mentored by one more experienced. Graphic design students can earn credits toward their educational careers as well as valuable insight and knowledge.

Training to become a graphic designer can be achieved at a variety of schools and colleges, many of them online. Associates’ and Bachelor’s degrees can be earned in a wide variety of fields, such as digital multimedia, web design, and art and advertising-and can be completed in two years, allowing for a quick entry into the graphic design workplace as an assistant. Going on for additional training at a four-year college will help you become more marketable, and often these schools can assist you in finding employment, or at the very least provide a fruitful networking environment. Another critical piece of the career puzzle is your portfolio; this collection of pieces of your original work allows employers to see your very best efforts. Your chosen school can often give you direction in constructing an effective portfolio. It’s recommended that you continue to add to your portfolio as you gain experience, in order to keep it relevant.

Expect to work at least three years as a graphic designer before moving up the corporate ladder; according to the U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, experienced graphic designers can advance to positions such as chief designer or art or creative director. And it’ll be awhile before you can splurge on a vacation, too: in May 2008, median wages for graphic designers were $42,400, just $35,000 for entry-level designers according to the American Institute of Graphic Arts. If you’re on the ground floor, or just out of graphic design school, the best cities to work in as a graphic designer are New York, San Francisco, and Los Angeles. Even with demand increasing for good graphic designers, competition remains fierce-but with the right preparation and skills, it’s a career well worth investing in.

Key Qualities And Skills A Good Career Counselor Should Have

Nowadays, a lot of young people still have a hard time finding out which career path to take. They usually have a problem with this because their interests and skills set do not match. Or the teenager’s parents or whoever will be financially supporting their college education want them to take a course that unfortunately, they do not like or have an interest in.

In such instances, teenagers can benefit greatly by talking with and seeking advice from career counselors. These counselors specialize in helping point clients, especially young ones, in the right direction of finding the appropriate career path for them. They will assess their clients using certain tests and interviews to get an idea of where their talents or interests lie. After getting the results, they will make the suitable career suggestions depending on the answers the client gave during the testing and interviews.

The right career counselor to go to though should not just be competent in giving out tests and handling interviews. He or she should have certain key qualities and traits that should include the following:

A genuine interest in others and with helping them. A good career counselor should have the drive and energy to sit with people through their best and worst. He or she should be fully present when listening to their clients’ stories, however difficult or long they are. Keep in mind that a good career counselor should always have a sustained commitment to facilitating human-to-human connection and positive transformation.

Good listening skills. Effective listening is a key skill any counselor should have. A good career counselor should not only to listen to what is being said, but how it is said, why it is being said, and what it means in the context of a particular client. The ideal career counselor should also be able to listen “between the lines,” for those things that are not being said by the client. This is because what a client omits from a session can speak just as clearly as what is communicated out loud. In addition, a good counselor should know how to listen without passing judgment or evaluation.

Authenticity and accessibility. Lastly, a counselor should not only be accessible to their clients in order to gain their trust, but he or she needs to be genuine and empathetic as well when listening and communicating with the clients. The best career counselor should be adept at developing a genuine empathetic connection with each client so that the counseling process can move forward and the counselor-client relationship can become stronger and more effective.

Read more useful articles regarding career counseling here.

Substance Abuse Psychology Careers

Substance-Abuse Counselors help people who have substance-abuse problems, people who fear that they may develop substance-abuse problems and the friends and family members of addicts who are suffering from or have suffered from substance-abuse problems.

As a Substance-Abuse Counselor you will help people who are addicted to drugs, alcohol or both. You will also help addicts with practical aspects of life and dealing with real life issues such as finding a job. As a Substance-Abuse Counselor you won’t prescribe medicines or provide medical or psychological therapy. You would usually be employed by Doctors, Psychologists or Social Workers.

As a Substance-Abuse Counselor you can find employment opportunities with halfway houses, outpatient clinics, hospitals, treatment centers, or social services agencies. You will also conduct counseling sessions for an addict or a group of addicts where they help addicts to talk about and cope with their addiction problems. At halfway houses, you will be helping addicts who live there while they are under treatment. At the outpatient clinics you would be helping the addicts who regularly come there for their treatment.

As a Substance-Abuse Counselor, you won’t be just working with drug addicts or alcoholics. You will also be working with people who want to quit habits such as smoking or those who want to quit their dependency on pain killer medicines.

In order to work as a Substance-Abuse Counselor, you can start by getting training on the job. This training can last from six months and can go for as long as two years. You can also get an Associates Degree or a Bachelors Degree in Substance-Abuse Psychology. You will study a number of concepts, theories, studies, methods of research, trends and values that apply to human behavior related to substance-abuse. You will also learn how to apply scientific methods to evaluate behavior and mental processes relating to personal, social and organizational issues in connection with substance-abuse.

You can also work your way towards a Masters Degree in Mental Health Counseling. As a Substance-Abuse Counselor, you can earn an average annual salary of above $30,000 per year.

Thus, as a Substance Abuse Counselor you will be a part of the country’s network of personnel who are preventing the crime of drug use and abuse from affecting the young and old alike – helping people live better lives and finding their way to a healthier, happier future.