Weaponizing Employment Against the Poor

Albert Einstein elegantly once said that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again, but expecting different results. This adage comes to mind when we see that yet again work requirements are being used as a bludgeon to combat Americans who live in poverty and who are in need of safety-net programs like Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), HUD housing assistance, and if President Trump has his way, even Medicaid.

The White House Council of Economic Advisers has recommended work requirements for the most extensive welfare programs and the current administration has mandated that federal agencies alter their presumably lax welfare program standards. These moves are premised on the continuing notion that the poor are a drain on federal resources due to their laziness, recklessness, and lack of ambition. So here we go again, concluding that the poor are so, solely because of their own deficient behavior and must be made to work harder to receive assistance from this government.

It’s not that simple.

Is this work requirement approach fair in that recipients of aid (excluding children, elderly and disabled) should be made to show an attempt to earn their government supports, which allegedly incentives people to not be poor, or is this a kick to the poor and disenfranchised when they’re already down?

It’s worth examining a few of points about welfare work requirements:

1. According to the US Census Bureau the 2017 poverty rate was 12.3%, a 0.4% decrease from the year before. Since 2014 the poverty rate has fallen 2.5%. So if the current trend line is a declining poverty rate why is a harsh condition like work requirements for the poor necessary at this time?

2. This effort was last tried under Bill Clinton and Newt Gingrich with their 1996 welfare reform legislation. We’ve had a couple decades to see how that has gone and studies like those from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and in the book Making Ends Meet (Edin and Lein) show that despite short term marginal improvements in employment they were not sustainable, mostly due to necessary and increased living expenses, absorbing any work generated financial gains.

3. Where are these jobs that the poor are supposed to get? If you’ve spent most of your life in poverty chances are quite low you can pick up a knowledge-economy job quickly. We’ve all heard how the traditional manual labor jobs are drying up, so what’s left? Lousy-waged part-time jobs with unpredictable and changeable hours is what’s left.

4. If the government feels the need to pick on somebody shouldn’t it be the employers of vast numbers of unskilled and low-skilled who pay their workers, including the working poor, insufficient wages that in turn need to be underwritten by the American tax payers?

Now one place where there could be political agreement is in the government providing subsidized high quality work training requirements targeted to actually helping the poor get the knowledge and skills needed for a globalized and digitized economy. Currently, training requirements can be in lieu of work requirements, but their effectiveness remains questionable.

The causes and cures for poverty are varied, complex, and far beyond the scope of this piece. But if we as a society are truly interested in ameliorating the condition of poverty (as we should be!) we need to be looking for demonstrably beneficial interventions that measurably make positive differences. Requiring the poor to get a low-end job that increases their child care and transportation costs just to prove they’re not milking the system or making them pay for a hand up from those of us with tax paying means is not a humane way to go about it.

GEICO Careers – How Can I Pass The GEICO Employment Test?

GEICO are the USA’s 3rd largest insurance company, so they can afford to be picky about who they have on board. Team players and effective communicators are a must. If that describes you and you desire a new career within GEIGO, who is the ideal candidate and what do you need to do to succeed? Join me as I review GEICO careers – how can I pass the GEICO employment test?

GEICO is a “people’s people” organisation and do not believe in doing transactions with their customers – they believe in interacting. Customer service is the top priority and team work is the key that unlocks successful interaction. Although they expect a lot from their associates, GEICO offer success-building tools such as industry-led training, in-house classes and online training through their very own GEICO University.

But first you have to get past that GEICO Employment Test! So, what is it for and what will you need to do?

The GEICO Employment Test should really be called the pre-employment test. Geared to evaluate exactly the skills, talents and knowledge you possess, each test is tailor-made for the specific job applied for.

It is based on real-life situations staff meet within the market place, and the goal is to weed out anyone likely to wimp out on the shop floor. The test is roughly in 3 sections:

1) Reading and comprehension. Based on real life situations, you will be asked to read a series of short stories and answer a set of questions. It seems a bit redundant since they expect post-grads and those with previous experience to apply for their jobs, but it is mandatory.

2) Typing and computer skills. This is a multiple choice, basic skills test to find out what level you currently operate at in terms of typing and computer programme knowledge. Since communication is a key element to their success, there may even be a grammar test slipped in.

3) Role-play. If you don’t like the idea role-play and cringe at the thought of it – turn away now! Placed in the setting of customer/associate situations, you may be asked to either be the GEICO representative dealing with a customer, or a customer wanting advice and help. The aim is to evaluate your sales skills and see how you work under pressure, so stay cool and calm, and don’t forget to treat the associate with courtesy!

Knowing what to expect can really help you to be well prepared for the interview. I hope your plan A works out. However, if you didn’t get through and need to revert to Plan B, have you considered a new career in marketing? The internet has opened up the market place to the entire world and there are enormous opportunities to put the knowledge and skills you already possess to good use in an online business of your own. New skills will be required, so click on the following link now http://www.earnyourwealth.co.uk to meet a man who trains his students how to earn the best income in a profitable home business niche. I hope you have enjoyed my GEIGO Career review – how can I pass the GEICO employment test?

Cosmetologist Careers: Employment Outlook

Cosmetology is an exciting field in growing demand. This is good news for anyone wishing to enter into a career in cosmetology.

You may be asking yourself some of these questions:

What sort of careers are out there for cosmetologists?

Who is hiring?

Will I be able to find a job?

Is their room for advancement?

What kind of money can I expect to make?

This article will answer these questions and more.

“… overall employment of barbers, cosmetologists and other personal appearance workers is projected to grow much faster than the average for all occupations,” states the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Employment Outlook for Cosmetologist Careers

Employment will likely vary depending on which cosmetologist career you enter into, but in general, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects:

  • “… employment as a hair stylist or cosmetologist is expected to grow at least 20% by 2018.”
  • “… this growth will primarily come from an increasing population, which will lead to greater demand for basic hair services.”

Advancement Opportunities for Cosmetologists

Earnings can be expected to increase along with in-demand cosmetology skills and hands-on salon experience. There truly is something for everyone. There are options for growth for many cosmetologist career fields, including:

  • Salon management
  • Salon ownership
  • Service or product sales
  • Image consulting
  • Teaching in a cosmetology school

Earnings for a Career in Cosmetology in Colorado

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, salaries can be expected to vary depending on area of expertise, level of employment, location and size of the salon, tips, bonuses, service commissions and number of hours worked. Many cosmetologists can also earn commissions on salon the products they are able to sell to their clients.

Earning stats from the U.S. Bureau of Labor

Mean Annual Salary Potential Earnings

• $12.74/hr • Up to $19.97/hr

• $26,510/yr • As much as $41,540/yr

Top Factors Determining Cosmetologist Career Salaries

  • Size and location of the salon
  • Hours worked
  • Level of skill and experience
  • Area of expertise (Hair/Nails/Makeup/Skin)
  • Tipping habits of clients
  • Competition from other salons
  • The cosmetologist’s ability to bring in and maintain regular clients

Summary

Now that you have the facts, you can go into your new career in cosmetology with confidence. You now know what to expect and what you can do to get the most out of your new career as a professional cosmetologist. Find a Cosmetology school today and make it official!